Bugs in Your Kitchen

 In this unedited version of Goldilocks and the Three Bears, the bears are seen examining pantry pests which have apparently made their way into the meal used to make breakfast.

In this unedited version of Goldilocks and the Three Bears, the bears are seen examining pantry pests which have apparently made their way into the meal used to make breakfast.

In our last blog, we talked about bugs which are attracted to water in our home. You’d think there would be a lot of overlap in the insects which are attracted to water and the bugs which are helping themselves to our food, but, sadly, this is not the case. There are a plethora of insects which are attracted to our snacks and staples. Also, the heat from warm appliances and our propensity for spilling makes the kitchen an ideal place for pests. Today, we’re going to consider some of the bugs which infest our kitchens and answer the question The Three Bears should have been asking: “Who's been sleeping in my porridge?”

While ants and flies can be considered two of the most pervasive drop-in guests, the cooler temperatures have made them less likely, so we’ll save a pest control discussion of them for another day.

Cockroaches

These bad boys seem to be everywhere, right? Not only are they repulsive, but research tells us that their shedding, saliva and fecal matter is responsible for triggering asthma and allergy symptoms. Their favorite places are floors, counters, sinks, trash cans and stoves, but newspapers and boxes give them excellent places in which to hide, as well. Some people use sticky traps, but they aren’t safe for young children or pets, since they, too, can become caught in them.

Indian meal moths

Those tiny yellow worms which seem to leave shell casings in your pantry corners are the larvae of Indian meal moths. Look closely, and you’ll see their small, dark head. You’ll find them in food, wriggling around like a miniature version of something out of a horror movie. But, wait! It’s not over. After they molt and leave dried encrustations of their former selves in your pantry, they create webs and cocoons so they can turn into moths. Then, you’ll have ½ in dark-colored moths flying around your lights and night, and settling into corners of the ceiling and other places during the day. Vigorous cleaning of areas where they live and hide is in order.

Weevils

Rice weevils, granary weevils, maize weevils all come in packaged food or bags of rice, flour, or other staples. Food which has been infested with weevils needs to be thrown away. Other measures include transferring food immediately into air-tight jars or other containers. Some people freeze their staples for 4-7 days as soon as they bring it home, since cold kills weevils. Thoroughly clean any pantries where weevils have been found, making sure to use a vacuum (with a crevice tool as needed) to suck up any remaining stragglers.

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All weevils are prolific breeders and can move great distances to get to new sources of food, making them a persistent cause of grief. Since most household bug killers are toxic, using them in the kitchen is not recommended.

We are happy to report that a great pest control company becomes very helpful in situations where unwanted pantry guests have arrived. There is no reason to be continually battling various bugs when a pest control service can evict them in their entirety.

If you want organic-based and are pet and kid friendly pest control, call Iron Mantis at 480-779-8696.